SPEAK OUT: Proposed ban on sodas larger than 16 ounces


New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg

says the federal government isn’t doing anything to help stop the growing epidemic of obesity in the U.S. He wants to ban the sale of sodas sold larger than 16 oz. in NYC. Will this work?  

A little Krispy Kreme history brings some sweet treats your way!


If you like the taste of Krispy Kreme doughnuts, you may be able to get some for FREE just for taking a moment to read and answer a trivia question. Anyone in the U.S. who has a Krispy Kreme store in their area can win.

The trivia question below can be found fairly quickly and you will learn a bit of Krispy Kreme history that you can share with your co-workers. What’s not to love winning the following:

  1. A dozen Krispy Kreme glazed doughnuts
  2. A Krispy Kreme signature item
  3. 12 oz. of Krispy Kreme coffee
  4. Your own Krispy Kreme paper hat

Trivia Question:

The Krispy Kreme Corporation is conecting socially with its customers in a whole new way. In fact, the company just released an app. What does the app offer?

Here’s a link to help you find the answer.

To Enter:

Look for the ‘Leave Comment’ link at the very bottom of this article to submit your answer for your opportunity to win a Krispy Kreme gift pack!

Krispy Kreme trivia week


If you like the taste of Krispy Kreme doughnuts, you may be able to get some for FREE just for taking a moment to read and answer a trivia question. Anyone in the U.S. who has a Krispy Kreme store in their area can win.

The trivia question below can be found fairly quickly and you will learn a bit of Krispy Kreme history that you can share with your co-workers. What’s not to love winning the following:

  1. A dozen Krispy Kreme glazed doughnuts
  2. A Krispy Kreme signature item
  3. 12 oz. of Krispy Kreme coffee
  4. Your own Krispy Kreme paper hat

Trivia Question:

Where did the founder, Vernon Rudolph come up with the Krispy Kreme name?

Follow this link to find the answer.

Look for the ‘Leave Comment’ link at the very bottom of this article to submit your answer for your opportunity to win a Krispy Kreme gift pack!

Krispy Kreme uses business history as trivia for U.S. giveaways


Another tid bit from Krispy Kreme’s history gives you the chance to win a gift pack from the successful corporation, celebrating its 75th year in business.

If you know the answer to the trivia question listed below, send in your answer for a chance to win:

  1. A dozen Krispy Kreme glazed doughnuts
  2. A Krispy Kreme signature item
  3. 12 oz. of Krispy Kreme coffee
  4. Your own Krispy Kreme paper hat

Trivia Question:

Where did the founder, Vernon Rudolph open up the first Krispy Kreme store?

Follow this link to find the answer.

Look for the ‘Leave Comment’ link at the very bottom of this article to submit your answer for your opportunity to win a Krispy Kreme gift pack!

Krispy Kreme 75th Birthday Trivia


Image

From Tuesday, May 8th through Friday, May 11th, the Krispy Kreme Corporation is offering a gift pack to four Krispy Kreme fans as part of a year long celebration of Krispy Kreme’s 75 years of tasty success. Trivia questions are based on the history of Krispy Kreme.

So, in the spirit of business history, here are some interesting findings about the international doughnut corporation that may come in handy for a bit of water cooler conversation, if nothing else.

The world-famous Original Glazed® doughnut first came about from a man named Vernon Rudolph who purchased a recipe and made the doughnuts using a screen, kettle and washtub,

The first Krispy Kreme doughnuts were made in Winston-Salem, North Carolina on July 13, 1937, in case you want to mark that date for the official birthday. By the end of the year, Rudolph had eight company trucks delivering doughnuts throughout the area, known today as the Triad.

Want to read more about Krispy Kreme’s humble beginnings?

Visit “Krispy Kreme celebrates 75 years.”

Today’s (5-8-2012) Trivia Question:

  • In business, the brand is everything. When thinking of a certain company and its brand, you may have an image of the company’s logo in mind. When it comes to Krispy Kreme’s brand, the logo that represents this business is described as having the shape of a ‘bowtie.’ What are the main colors of  Krispy Kreme’s logo and has it always been designed using the same colors?

Hint: To find out the correct answer, visit this Krispy Kreme link.

Today’s trivia winner will receive a gift pack that includes:

  1. Coupon for a dozen world-famous Original Glazed® doughnuts
  2. Krispy Kreme paper hat
  3. 12 oz. bag of House Blend Coffee
  4. Krispy Kreme collectible

The 75th correct answer submitted will be sent the Krispy Kreme gift pack.

So, take a moment to test your Krispy Kreme trivia knowledge and have a tidbit to chat about around the water cooler at work while enjoying some goodies that you can share…or not. 🙂

To Enter:

Look for the ‘Leave Comment’ link at the very bottom of this article to submit your answer for your opportunity to win a Krispy Kreme gift pack!

Leveraging Connections for Business Funding (contributor – James Kim)


You’re smart. You know that, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration, 64% of net new jobs in the past 15 years have come from small businesses. You know that small businesses are booming. You also know that there are plenty of business solutions out there offered by companies so that you can easily get your business off the ground without having to worry about every small detail. What you don’t know, however, is where to get funding for that business idea rolling around in your head. But you know what? You know people. Here are the top three ways to gain business funding by leveraging your connections:

1. Family and friends

Why not try the most obvious place? Go ahead and see if you have any close acquaintances who are either interested in loaning you money or even becoming a partner. You already get along well with them, so you know that they’ll be nicer to talk to about this stuff than an employee at the nearest bank. Just make sure you write up a contract so that, when everything is over, you’re still friends.

2. Networking for angel investors

Angel investing has been booming in the past few years. According to Travis Kalanick, CEO and founder of UBER, this change is caused by the ever growing importance of social networking. He claims that “how you get angel funding has substantially changed because we know who to go after.  It’s very clear because they’re all blogging and tweeting out their interests on angel investing and their thoughts on it … Now, it’s much, much quicker to get these deals done.” So start looking around your existing social networks or jump in by looking at the people you know who are already there. There are plenty of people out there who would love to hear about your idea!

3. Connecting to venture capital

The research firm CB Insights notes that “venture capital investments rose 19 percent, to $21.8 billion in 2010 — the first annual increase since the downturn.” There’s more venture capital money out there than ever before, meaning there’s a better chance for you to be able to get a piece of the pie. However, venture capital isn’t as easy to get as angel investment. You’ll have to work through the people that you know to find an “in” to pitch your idea and have the chance at funding.

When it comes to funding your new business idea, don’t think that you have to go on an arduous quest. Instead, look around you at the connections you already have and see if you can rustle up some money that way. It’s not always easy, but it’s easier than having to start from scratch!

James Kim is a writer for Choosewhat.com. ChooseWhat is a company that provides product reviews and test data for business services and products.  Their goal is to help small companies make informed buying decisions on business solutions that help their business.

Oklahoma City fans pull for Dallas Mavericks at home game without knowing it


(Photo by David Madison)

For many, part of enjoying the weekend and turning your mind away from work is to turn on the tube to catch some great sports including the NBA semi finals.

However, to many watching the game or actually being in the crowd cheering for Oklahoma City or Dallas, it may have been confusing knowing who was supposed to be cheering for whom.

That’s because the t-shirts worn by almost every fan at the game were blue.

For the full story, read Examiner.com Oklahoma City fans pull for Dallas Mavericks at home game without knowing it – National Business Strategies | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/business-strategies-in-national/oklahoma-city-fans-pull-for-dallas-mavericks-at-home-game-without-knowing-it#ixzz1NKbAOKhy

Free mobile app makes calls free, too!


(photo by Ryan McVay)

VoIP services such as Skype already offer mobile applications, but as springwise.com reports, typically users must create an account, build a contact list and then launch the app each time they want to make a free call.

Not so with Voxtrot, a free mobile app that seamlessly integrates into the phone’s standard calling function and automatically makes calls free when Voxtrot users talk to one another.

For the full story, continue reading on Examiner.com Free mobile app makes calls free, too! – National Business Strategies | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/business-strategies-in-national/free-mobile-app-makes-calls-free-too#ixzz1NKYlBxC3

How brand history can grow your business


History can grow business (photo-Rob Melnychuk)


Traditionally, consumers like what they know and understand. The more a potential customer can relate to a product and service, the more likely they are going to see its value in their lives. With so many small businesses looking for a way to stand out among the competition, one idea is to maximize the history of your product or service.

If you are a second or third generation owner of a business and you are looking to rejuvenate your sales, consider sharing the details of how your company began.

For instance, Moravian cookies are not only loved but are well-known by the history of the product. One company proving this case is Mrs. Hanes’ Moravian Cookies, dating back to the 1920s. The history or longevity of a product shows the product’s ability to sustain the test of time and appreciation by generations of customers.

Though you may feature this information online, have you considered using your product’s history as a marketing tool in your advertisement or public relations efforts?

Take the supermarket and restaurant industries. Think of the many grocery shoppers who spend time reviewing nutritional labels and those looking for menu items that are labeled heart-healthy.

Springwise.com has researched ten food brands that give consumers access to information on the origins of their products’ ingredients. While these efforts are baby steps toward true traceability — and critics are somewhat justified in their assertion that images of verdant fields and smiling farmers are little more than marketing tools — smart brands are nonetheless moving in the direction of increased transparency.

1. Stone-Buhr — Buyers of Stone-Buhr’s All Purpose Flour can type in a lot code on the company’s website to see which family farms grew the grain. Stone-Buhr’s emphasis is on spotlighting the family-owned farms in the Northwest who supply it with certified sustainable wheat.
Website: http://www.findthefarmer.com

2. Coca-Cola — In the UK, Coca-Cola launched a web app that allows consumers to trace the origin of their can or bottle of Coke. Instead of divulging the sources of ingredients, Coca-Cola focuses on manufacturing locations, distribution and environmental impact. It estimates the carbon footprint of a drink, and shows the address of the factory it was made in.
Website: www.coca-cola.co.uk/environment/trace-your-coke.html

3. Askinosie — Missouri-based chocolate maker Askinosie invites customers to enter a ‘Choc-O-Lot’ number to view the chocolate’s geographical origin, as well as information about the farmers who grew the cocoa beans. The tool highlights the company’s commitment both to quality and to a fair deal for farmers. Askinosie buys directly from farmers in Mexico, Phillipines, Tanzania and Ecuador, and doesn’t purchase beans until they’ve met the farmers in person.
Website: www.askinosie.com

4. Dole Organic — Dole lets consumers “travel to the origin of each organic product”. By typing in a fruit sticker’s three-digit code on Dole Organic’s website, customers can find the story behind their banana or pineapple. Each farm’s section on the website includes background info, shows photos of the crops and workers and tells consumers more about the origin of Dole’s organic products.
Website: www.doleorganic.com

5. Chippindale Foods — Chippindale Foods supplies free range eggs to supermarkets in northern England. The company created wheresyoursfrom.com to allow consumers to find out where their eggs were laid. After entering the code printed on an egg carton, people can view pictures of ‘their’ farmer and hens, and read a history of the farm.
Website: www.wheresyoursfrom.com

6. Frito-Lay — Another big brand that’s embracing traceability is Frito-Lay. Its Chip Tracker lets consumers trace where a particular bag of chips was made, by entering their ZIP code along with the first three digits of the bag’s product code. The site returns a specific location along with its annual output. An associated map, meanwhile, highlights both growing and production facilities.
Website: www.fritolay.com/lays/chip-tracker.html

7. Fresh Express — A subsidiary of Chiquita Brands and purveyor of washed and packaged salad greens, Fresh Express allows consumers to find the origin of their salad through a ‘Leaf Locator’ on the company’s website. Fresh Express sources leafy greens from five US states and Mexico, and includes details on a location’s climate, growing season and agricultural history.
Website: www.freshexpress.com

8. Crop to Cup — Through Crop to Cup’s website, consumers can trace their coffee back to the farmers who produced it. Drinkers of Uganda Bugisu coffee, for example, can read a profile of Peter Guimuii, who is married, has six children and approximately 5,000 coffee trees. The detailed personal information provided underscores Crop to Cup’s goal of improving farmers’ livelihoods.
Website: www.croptocup.com

9. Domino’s Pizza — Pizza lovers don’t enter product codes on ‘Behind the Pizza’, which was created by Domino’s to give consumers more information on how their pizza ingredients are made. While the site does show manufacturing plants and farms it works with, the focus here is more on edutainment than targeted transparency.
Website: more.dominos.com/behindthepizza

10. Iglo — First featured on Springwise in 2008, ‘Woher kommt Ihr Spinat’ is still going strong. Created by Iglo, a European market leader in the frozen foods segment, the program gives consumers access to details on where their spinach came from. Offsetting its Big Brand reputation, Iglo displays pictures of the spinach grower and his or her family, alongside information about the farm.
Website: www.iglo.de

Want to grow your brand’s awareness and increase sales? Consider going back in time to capture your products’ history to re-introduce the value of your offerings to consumers anywhere.

U.S. Economists Stunned by Today’s Jobless Rate



Today, U.S. economists are stunned by November’s job loss rate. This is after 2 million Americans have seen an end to their unemployment benefits while 15.1 million people are still without a job.

U.S. employers added 39,000 jobs to their payrolls in November, the Labor Department reported. That marks a major slowdown from October, when the economy added an upwardly revised 172,000 jobs.

U.S. economists had expected November’s increase in jobs to be anywhere from 97,000 conservatively all the way up to 150,000.

While private businesses continued to hire for the eleventh month in a row, they also missed expectations. Companies added just 50,000 jobs to their payrolls in October, falling short of the 175,000 jobs economists had predicted for the sector.

As gains were primarily in the services industry, the retail sector surprised experts the most with the loss of 28,000 jobs in November.

The unemployment rate, which is calculated in a separate survey, unexpectedly ticked up to 9.8% after holding at 9.6% for the prior three months.